Commissions

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Portraiture

Brian Barnett 

14 by 18 inch stretched canvas board, oil painting

In the initial creation of a portrait. the most important part is the preliminary sketch.  With this sketch I can understand how my composition will look, plot the shadows and highlights and get a small sense of the figure's likeness. When I'm happy with my sketch and have made any changes, I think necessary, I move forward with the painting. Initially creating a block of common colour's to create rough shapes and tones. I slowly build detail and likeness with layers of thicker and thicker paint. It is also important to note when creating a portrait, to always paint the background in conjunction with the figure as this will determine the colours.

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Portraiture

Maj (MAA) Barney Barnett RAPTC

14 by 18 inch stretched canvas board, oil painting

The process of oil painting is definitely a long one, taking intense focus and precision to create a finished piece. The majority of the time you are struggling with the paints to create form and likness out of nothing and often it is not till you're near the end, do I find, I even begin to understand what I've been doing till that moment. " Trusting the Process " are the words I think all artists can agree are the most repeated to oneself while creating.  That is the beauty of it, the slow arduous process of adding mark after mark, over hours and hours, to create something from nothing.  No matter what that feeling is when you finish a piece of work, put down your tools and take a final breath before walking away, is easily, at least to me, the best feeling in the world. The closest I will ever get to true peace. 

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Portraiture

Victor Bernard Moss "Bernard"

16.5 by 11.7 inch, Fine grain texture watercolor paper, Chalk pastel

Chalk pastel is a very different medium to oil paints in many ways, put simply chalk pastels are a dry drawing medium and oils are a wet painted medium. Creating a piece with chalk pastel is a matter of mark making, building suggestions of form by blending pigment and sealing them with fixative to apply new distinct marks over them. Just as important as the medium itself, the paper used for the piece has just as much impact on the final 

product. For example, here i used a textured

watercolor paper which impacted the 

drawing, by creating rougher grainer marks

rather than sleeker marks, a smooth paper would 

allow. This gives the drawing an added textural 

quality than intrigues the viewer and gives 

a certain sense of depth when contrasting the 

smoother areas of the portrait.

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Landscape

Home in Australia 

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Portraiture

Angela Emerson

30 by 24 inch, stretched canvas board, oil painting

At the time of creating the piece, it was the largest oil painting I had ever created and was a huge learning experience for me. I had to learn new techniques, use new equipment and use different methods to work at this larger size. Most interestingly, was the difficulty in just creating a straight line. Easy enough normally, but due to the size and constant wetness of oil paints I had to go out and create a Mahl stick. Something I had never needed before and made from a stick some scrunch fabric, a zip tie and fake leather. Most importantly however was the new ability to squeeze every atom out of a paint tube like my life depended on it, as the nearest shop was far away and I swore there more titanium white in this tube.

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